The Battle of Seattle

post written by Emma Filbrun

The Battle of Seattle by Douglas BondTitle: The Battle of Seattle
Author: Douglas Bond
Series: Heroes & History
Major Themes: Indians, Native Americans, Pacific Northwest, War, Washington
Synopsis: Teenaged Bill Tidd has a lot to worry about already, with having to protect and provide for his little sister, when war breaks out with the Indians and he is expected to do his part.

I must say, Douglas Bond writes a gripping story! He has a way of making history come to life. I found The Battle of Seattle quite fascinating and hard to put down. I had no idea that there was a war like the one described here in the Pacific Northwest.

William, or Bill, Tidd was a young man who lived alone with his little sister Junebug in a cabin his father had built; there was some tragedy three years before the story begins which deprived them of their parents. Bill is determined that nothing will happen to his little sister. He can’t understand his neighbor, Noclas, an old Negro trapper who loves to read and quote his Bible, and he can’t understand why Junebug would want to listen to Noclas sing something like Psalm 23 to her as she is going to sleep—what a morbid song, talking about the “valley of the shadow of death!” He has a close friend, Charlie, an Indian boy who often seems just like white people but just as often acts Indian.

Tensions are heating up between the Indians in the area and the white people, but surely it is just the warlike Indians from farther away who are the problem—the locals are all peaceable. Or are they? Bill is talked into joining the local militia, and becomes an express rider for his group of 20 men. When they are ambushed, and then Charlie shows up, what will Bill do? Can he trust his friend?

I found this book fascinating and awful at the same time. It was fascinating because it told the story of a part of American history that I had never heard of before. I had no idea that there were problems between Indians and white settlers in the Pacific Northwest. It was awful because it was about a war. As always happens in war, there were atrocities committed by both sides. Douglas Bond describes just enough to convey the horrors that Bill Tidd saw, but it was pretty bad at times.

I received a free ecopy of this book from NetGalley and chose to write a review.

WARNING: Dang or danged is used in chapter 21, twice in one paragraph in chapter 24, in chapter 35, and twice in chapter 41. Chapters 23 through 43 are about the war, with shooting, fires and death mentioned or described frequently.


Age Levels:

Read Aloud—Ages 10 – 13
Reading Independently—Ages 12 – 15, 15 and Above

 

Links to buy The Battle of Seattle:

Amazon: Paperback | Kindle

AbeBooks: View Choices on AbeBooks.com

Book Depository: Paperback

 


Keywords:
Indians, Native Americans, Pacific Northwest, War, Washington

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